Hello world. My name is Pasia Yang. It has a weird pronunciation, it's not phonetic at all. I'm a graphic design student in my last 100m of school. This is my blog for my 470. Here I will be posting process and stuff pertaining to my class work. If you want to go see my main blog, click here.
We Are On the Front Page of DIGG!!!

betholsondesign:

check it out yo! Our 8-bit Hallway Social Practices project made it to the front page of DIGG.com! Sweet!

(Source: betholsoncreative)

3 years ago
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I’ve realized I want to continue working, adding, and expanding this project. :)

3 years ago
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470 Finals Day Photos

I took photos of some projects today. If anyone wants the larger version feel free to email me for them. Or if you want someone to shoot your projects I’m available too :)

3 years ago
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Eight design tips for great iPhone applications « Sequence Blog

For you apps people in class. After reading through it I kind of want to create my own app. Maybe during winter break.

3 years ago
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Hey PSU Art Student!

PSU ART STUDENT HOLIDAY GIFT SALE!
Open to the public!!!!
Hot cider and cocoa will be served.

 
When: PSU Art Student Holiday Gift Sale – Thursday, December 2, 2010, from: 3-6 p.m.

Where: AB Lobby Gallery, PSU Art Building, 2000 SW 5TH AVE. @ Jackson St.

Why: Because we like you!

What to know:

1. The Holiday Gift Sale is open to all currently enrolled PSU art students.
2. All work must be installed, by the artist, on Wednesday, December 1, 2010, from: 12-5 p.m. (Work is to be installed salon style, on a first come, first serve basis, and should be modest in scale and price.)
3. All work must be for sale and removable wall labeled with the artist’s, name, title, price, and contact information for the buyer.
4. Participating artists are responsible for the sale of their own work and receive all proceeds.
5. All work must be removed by Friday, December 10, 2010.
3 years ago
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Familiar faces

Oh this looks familiar…

see previous post

3 years ago
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Reading Responses

Catching up on reading responses…

Chapter 1: Attributes for the Modern Designer

This chapter spoke a lot about cultural awareness and knowing things other than design.

studying the world beyond graphic design

I find this reassuring because I often feel like I do not have a lot of knowledge of the design world, rather I’m influenced and often time more interested in other things. Other subjects like science, mathematics, anthropology all need help making information beautiful, and I feel it’s my duty to not just make another pretty image for us designers to like, but for the rest of the world to see.

Chapter 2: How to Find/Get a Job

As graduation slowly creeps up on me, I’ve wondered what I’ll do after school is over. I’ve started interning with the hopes of figuring out what works for me. Would I like working in-house? Am I better suited going freelance? How do I market myself? How do I not make myself look stupid? Also, the tips about learning to enjoy the interview process and to constantly be updating your portfolio are great because it’s what we’ll always end up doing.

Chapter 3: Being Freelance

I feed off the energy of people around me and I was worried about starting freelance because I thought it meant I would be holed up at home alone. This chapter helped me understand a bit more about freelance and the types of clients who hire freelancers. I would also like to add that interning with Tim and Cassie also help in informing me how to tackle a freelance job. It also showed me how much more organized and resourceful I need to be going to vendors and getting quotes.

Chapter 4: Setting Up a Studio

I’m a former accounting major and we had to write up business plans a lot so I was not surprised at how much planning goes into starting a studio. Rather, it seemed a bit easier because there is not as much overhead compared to starting up a resturaunt. What was interesting to me in this chapter was how “hard” it is to stay a small business if the business starts to pick up, and how to keep it small by hiring out jobs instead of hiring permanent workers.

Chapter 5: Running Said Studio

There was a lot of great tips in this chapter that deals with the non-designer aspects of owning a studio:

"Always employ people who are better than you."
"Instigate a regular program of portfolio viewing."
"If you have a good reputation, talent will find you."
Non-design staff will be needed when the studio starts growing. Book keeper/accoutant + lawyer are your friends!

I took the studio class with Margaret this summer and we went around to many studios. I remember Topaz Design telling us about being nice to everyone they encounter. She gave an example of how she was in a rush to print something at Kinkos for her daughter one day, and when the worker noticed her card said Topaz Design, the Kinkos worker’s personality totally changed and was nicer and more helpful because their receptionist has always kept a good working relationship between the studio and Kinkos.

Chapter 6: Getting Work

The mission is to have an constant flow of work. When you are searching for work, it’s already too late. It was suggested to go after companies that need “root-and-branch” help because the bigger clients already will have bigger design firms in mind. From my understanding, a lot of the designers I have talked to about getting work have stated it’s mostly been word of mouth and having their portfolio seen. I’ve been told to get an online portfolio up asap because of this.

Chapter 7: CLIENTS!

Creating a portfolio for a client is different than creating a portfolio to get a job. Clients want to see what you’ve done, whereas a studio would like to see technical skills. I have not really had an opportunity to freelance while in school so I have no idea how to even begin to deal with clients. My first real encounter was while interning. This client was extremely conservative and not willing to new ideas. I thought Fosque was hard, but man, this client put me in my place! I had to work hard trying to make something that I was both proud of and what she’ll approve of.

Chapter 8: Self-Promotion

Again this is an area I feel I have not focused on. I find it hard to promote myself because I’m sort of a jack-of-all-trades. This book points out certain areas I can use to promote myself that I don’t agree with entering design competitions and attending design conferences and lectures. I think as a student we should not focus heavily on these areas but on others. I do think little things like keeping in touch with studios, keeping an online presence, continually doing good work, mailing out a small sample kit of work, and staying true to ones self is what I think is the best self-promotion.

Chapter 9: Creative Process

I find my mind is most active when I am not in my “design” mode. The greatest thing about being a designer is that we can pull anything and use it as inspiration. However, at the same time, what kind of sucks about being a designer is how we’re always on the look out for design ideas. It can be somewhat tiring but also very rewarding.

3 years ago
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While looking up shoe box packaging earlier this term I kept finding images of this package design for Puma by Fuse Project. This video shows a bit of the process, cool text animation, and infographics.

3 years ago
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sequence :: our work :: chipotle

Fun fun fun! I’ve been meaning to upload my photos of handwritten type, but with so many photos to edit, here’s a website to the creators of Chipotle’s new branding instead.

Also check out Anna Tou. She did the lettering. And look! I spy the MAX!

3 years ago
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theleagueofmoveabletype:

Here is a great collection of russian futurists’ books from 1910 to 1930. Most of these books were self-illustrated and self-published by their authors, and it looks like they loved experimenting with type.
Even though it’s cyrillic, perhaps someone might find it useful.

While I’m working on my hand drawn stuff… I like looking at different, non-English, stuff as inspiration. :) My one year of Russian did not go to waste!

theleagueofmoveabletype:

Here is a great collection of russian futurists’ books from 1910 to 1930. Most of these books were self-illustrated and self-published by their authors, and it looks like they loved experimenting with type.

Even though it’s cyrillic, perhaps someone might find it useful.

While I’m working on my hand drawn stuff… I like looking at different, non-English, stuff as inspiration. :) My one year of Russian did not go to waste!

3 years ago
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